The Rundown-Fri 3/8/18: Trump to meet Kim; Steve Moore on tariffs; hot dog!

A couple of great guests today:

At 7:06 we'll talk with occasional Trump economic advisor Steve Moore about the tariffs that the president signed into law on Thursday.

And at 8:06 we'll have a fun conversation with former CIA Agent Jason Hanson to talk about his new book, "Survive Like a Spy: Real CIA Operatives Reveal How They Stay Safe in a Dangerous World and How You Can Too"

It's extremely difficult to believe that Kim actually has any intention of giving up his nuclear program. My guess is that 1) the meeting will happen, but neither in the US nor in North Korea. Not even sure that South Korea is likely. Maybe something more like Vietnam. And 2) North Korea will offer a definition of "denuclearization" that Trump will not accept. The question is what will happen after that...

It's interesting to see the MSM nitpick the remarkable news about Kim Jong Un asking to meet President Trump. Here's a perfect example: https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/08/politics/trump-kim-jong-un-analysis/index.html

A pretty good four minutes on the approach by North Korea to President Trump...

President Trump made it official: He's implementing tariffs on imported steel and aluminum. That said, by excepting Canada and Mexico it substantially weakens the tariffs since those are our first and fourth largest international sources of steel, respectively. Those loopholes are better than none, and should help limit the ability of American steel producers to raise their prices.

One thing I want to make clear: while I am absolutely against these tariffs, unlike some people I am not at all surprised by them. Trump has had protectionist tendencies for at least 30 years and this sort of bad policy was a campaign promise which might have actually helped him win the Rust Belt states he needed to become president. I also think this is very good politics for him for at least the 2018 elections. As for 2020, that's a much harder question. Normally, I'd expect it to be a negative by then because of the economic harm tariffs cause, but because of the exceptions already in place for Canada and Mexico -- and I bet they put one in for South Korea -- it makes the policy a bit more like Swiss cheese, in a way that consumers should be grateful for.

Isn't this really more important, though?

The Ross Kaminsky Show

The Ross Kaminsky Show

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